Monday, 16 November 2009

Ashawo!

I hope the title doesn't offend you (ashawo means whore/prostitute, when one wants to be crude. Originally a Nigerian word, it is the generic term in Ghana now.), but my whole weekend has been tainted by Ashawo.

Firstly I must say it's been a great weekend! After weeks of sleep training, baby finally sleeps through the night and as a result we could get a babysitter (my mama) and go to a friend's birthday dinner at Le Magellan Friday night. When someone after dinner suggested we continue the night at Citizen Kofi, Virgo and I, like the two newly released prisoners we clearly were, screamed in unison "Yay!" (yes,our excitement was rather embarassing). When we got there, just around midnight, we realised that apart from us and a group of girls, there were a few older white men (clearly the target customers) and - you guessed it - ashawo.

After dancing for about an hour they played a song I recognised that I'd been hearing in the past few weeks and of course, when it got to the chorus, I heard what it was - yes - Ashawo! Interestingly, at this point the two prostitutes who had been putting on a nasty, somewhat disjointed mapouka-like show all evening, stood this one out, each suddenly very busy texting away on their phones.


Yesterday, we headed to Tema to what turned out to be the after party of a funeral and whilst waiting for our friend's requested song, the new Slim Buster/Tinny collaboration to play, what did we hear: Ashawo.

The song, an old Nigerian classic from our parents' days, is so catchy in its beat that anybody can end up singing along, if not also dancing. Yesterday, I laughed off a friend's fears that Ashawo might be baby Em's first words the way Virgo continued singing it all day long, however today, I'm slightly concerned. After humming it this afternoon, we got home to hear the same song playing at the drinking spot across the road. Just imagine the reactions of uncles, aunties and the ever present church brigade if at nine months little Em opens her mouth and blurts out:

Ashawo!

15 comments:

posekyere said...

LMGAO!
Geez!
I guess there is no way to isolate our children from the persistent bombardment from all angles.

Nana Kofi Acquah said...

Ashawo was before us. Ashawo will be after we are gone. The biggest concern we should have is how to keep our children safe from it all.

Nana Yaw Asiedu said...

Lol, I regret to announce that I've been listening to Ashawo the whole day at work while (pretending?) to work.

Anonymous said...

lmao, i kinda of like that song...i dont even understand all the lyrics but the beatz are on point

Sankofa said...

ROFL! I saw a few this weekend. I initially just thought they were waiting for a lift. I was quickly corrected....

The pale observer said...

That was a great and cute story! Maybe there's another word that sounds similar, with a less disturbing meaning that you convince everybody she is really saying...

Glad you guys had a night out - no doubt Mama dealt at home just fine? :)

The pale observer said...

That was a great and cute story! Maybe there's another word that sounds similar, with a less disturbing meaning that you convince everybody she is really saying...

Glad you guys had a night out - no doubt Mama dealt at home just fine? :)

Maya Mame said...

Definitely not the way the song is being played, Posekyere!

Maya Mame said...

Definitely, Nana Kofi. The world's oldest profession will outlive us in life and in song. Unfortunately the song means our children will probably hear of prostitution long before we'd wish them to.

Maya Mame said...

Nana Yaw, I can't blame you, my local spot sometimes plays it four times in a row!

Maya Mame said...

Anon, the song is just too catchy for its own good!

Maya Mame said...

Lol, Sankofa! I had a similar experience one night at Cantonments roundabout (aka Ashawo junction).

Maya Mame said...

Thanks Holli, maybe I'll try to trick people that she's speaking Swedish!

The night out was great, a real reward after training M to sleep through the night. She slept from 8pm til 5.30am so mym mum had a cool time babysitting.

Abena Serwaa said...

This song is as catchy /popular as Sidney's "Apuskeleke" some years back...
Hehehehe! I use to worry about the safety of the scantily-clad women forced to wait for transportation in the darkness around the Togo embassy.... Little did I know!

Maya Mame said...

I know Abena Serwaa! I used to think, how inconsiderate of their 'lifts' to make them wait in such dark corners!

(sorry for taking so long to reply).

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